Entwo for Enfield, north east London.

Poetry connects through metaphor and the music of words, into a deeper place in us. It unlocks doors in our understanding.
— By Maggie Butt

EN2, for Enfield, north London, featuring: news, arts, film, books, people, cycling, travel, food, drink, music, tech, culture, history & gardening.

Dark Ride - Chapter 1 - the ticket, read by the author Caroline Green. The book is coming out in May 2011 and is now listed on Amazon. Filmed by www.mediafox.co.uk

Making Waves: "We are all very proud of Sue!"

  Making waves for charity    A hardcore fundraiser has dived into a challenge to swim the English Channel for Enfield-based charity, The Nightingale Cancer Support Centre.   Sue Abbs, who developed Lymphodeama during treatment for breast cancer, was signed off from this clinic in February. She then set herself the challenge to swim 21 miles in seven weeks in her local swimming pool with the aim of raising £7000, which would pay for a Lymphodeama nurse for a year at The Nightingale.   Sue said, “The Nightingale has been a lifeline to me over the years and I am grateful for their services. I saw a Lymphodeama nurse much quicker than I would have done if The Nightingale didn’t fund this service to prioritise cancer patients.”   “I saw the swim challenge as an opportunity to get fit while, at the same time, I felt I could achieve something that will make a difference to others who might go through the same thing that I did. ”   She added, “All of us have busy lives but I wanted to prove that fundraising doesn’t have to be a chore or take up huge amounts of time. You can make it fun. Anyone can do it!”   Director Joan Kearns said, “For many people, including me, swimming just three lengths of the pool would be a challenge but swimming the Channel is taking it to another level, especially as when you’ve had cancer, your energy levels are no-where near what the used to be. We are all very proud of Sue!”    For anyone wishing to donate, Sue has a Just Giving page: https://www.justgiving.com/campaigns/charity/ncht/suechannelswim    Or if you’re feeling brave and want to take up the challenge yourself, either alone or as a part of a group, please contact The Nightingale on, 020 8366 4333 or visit the website, www.Nightingalesupport.org.uk 

Making waves for charity

A hardcore fundraiser has dived into a challenge to swim the English Channel for Enfield-based charity, The Nightingale Cancer Support Centre. 

Sue Abbs, who developed Lymphodeama during treatment for breast cancer, was signed off from this clinic in February. She then set herself the challenge to swim 21 miles in seven weeks in her local swimming pool with the aim of raising £7000, which would pay for a Lymphodeama nurse for a year at The Nightingale. 

Sue said, “The Nightingale has been a lifeline to me over the years and I am grateful for their services. I saw a Lymphodeama nurse much quicker than I would have done if The Nightingale didn’t fund this service to prioritise cancer patients.” 

“I saw the swim challenge as an opportunity to get fit while, at the same time, I felt I could achieve something that will make a difference to others who might go through the same thing that I did. ” 

She added, “All of us have busy lives but I wanted to prove that fundraising doesn’t have to be a chore or take up huge amounts of time. You can make it fun. Anyone can do it!” 

Director Joan Kearns said, “For many people, including me, swimming just three lengths of the pool would be a challenge but swimming the Channel is taking it to another level, especially as when you’ve had cancer, your energy levels are no-where near what the used to be. We are all very proud of Sue!” 

For anyone wishing to donate, Sue has a Just Giving page: https://www.justgiving.com/campaigns/charity/ncht/suechannelswim

Or if you’re feeling brave and want to take up the challenge yourself, either alone or as a part of a group, please contact The Nightingale on, 020 8366 4333 or visit the website, www.Nightingalesupport.org.uk 



 Anne-Marie Sanderson Photography

Anne-Marie Sanderson Photography

Enfield's literary legacy was celebrated at a festival aiming to inspire the next generation of writers.

BY JAMES CRACKNELL

The Arts Council-backed Enfield Literary Festival saw local authors give talks about their careers, offer advice, and host workshops. A lecture on one of the borough's most important historical figures, plus a talk on the future of journalism in the digital age, rounded off a varied and informative day.

Kicking off the event at the newly refurbished Edmonton Green Library was Catherine Johnson, a prize-winning children's author and scriptwriter for television shows including Eastenders and Casualty.

“I realise I'm really lucky to do what I do,” the Londoner explained. “I think school ruins writing for some people. Essay writing is not creative and it puts people off. I have uncles who have written poetry in Welsh – seeing someone I knew who had written something made it seem possible.”

Catherine's father is Jamaican and her mother Welsh. The story of how her parents got together in the 1950s in a Welsh village where, Catherine says, “they had never seen a black person”, became the basis of her first book.

Read more

 

 

If you want to find out more information for this inspiring sessions, please visit their website here, to find more.


Divest Enfield logo wide.jpg

Help persuade Enfield Council to divest from fossil fuels

By James Cracknell

Two years ago this month I cycled from London to Paris with a group of climate activists.

We were travelling to the United Nations’ COP21 climate talks, raising awareness of the importance of the talks along the way. On the Champs-Élysées we joined with tens of thousands of others – including many who had cycled from around Europe as we did – to demand the strongest possible global deal for reducing carbon emissions.

The outcome of this event, of course, was the Paris Agreement. It is the first single deal for all the world’s nations to reduce their carbon emissions, with an aim to limit global warming to below two degrees Celsius. For many people, including me, the deal is not strong nor ambitious enough. However, it is a starting point, and it is important that all political leaders – not just of nations but of regions, cities, and indeed local boroughs – do everything they can to meet the terms of the deal.

The Paris Agreement was formally ratified in November 2016 and recognises: “The need for an effective and progressive response to the urgent threat of climate change on the basis of the best available scientific knowledge."

A year later, however, it became clear that Enfield Council was not responding in the ‘effective and progressive’ manner the deal demands. Last month Fossil Free UK revealed that councils across the UK were investing more than £16billion in the fossil fuel industry. It showed that Enfield Council, through its pension fund, was investing more than £60million in such companies, representing 5.6% of its £1billion total investments.

Read more here


Chorus by Ray Lee.

Report by Entwo editorial.

The steel legs stuck firmly in the ground that propped up the propellor like metal arms at the Millfield Arts centre. A cluster of people waited in anticipation. A quick flicker and the red eyed creatures came to life. The slow spinning blades, filled the soundscape with a warm, rich, harmonic buzz. Children played and the rest stood perplexed and curious, capturing a rhythmic swing of spinning sounds, comforted by the trees that shielded a different sort of hum of passing traffic. So there they stood, tall insect like creatures that filled a mesmeric spacial sensory ride. 

The website Circulate, outdoor art for London reports that: Chorus is a monumental installation of giant kinetic sculptures, a celestial choir of spinning sound machines, created by award-winning artist and British Composer of the Year, Ray Lee. Towering above the audience, a series of giant metal tripods support rotating arms. At the end of each arm, loudspeakers emit precisely tuned musical pitches, singing out a siren call to all those present.

Chorus is produced by Simon Chatterton and commissioned by Newbury Corn Exchange, Brookes University and Oxford Contemporary Music. Chorus is funded by Arts Council England and PRS Foundation

This video was shot on the first public art performance using a smart phone at Millfield Arts Centre on Friday 10th November 2017.

 

Poem-a-thon inspiring approach to fund raising.

"Art saved my life." Local artist Patrick Samuel explains how art was instrumental in changing his life for the better. Why not find out more at by clicking here   

 
 Myddelton House Garden's museum. Photograph by Entwo

Myddelton House Garden's museum. Photograph by Entwo

 Myddelton House Gardens. Photograph: by Entwo

Myddelton House Gardens. Photograph: by Entwo

TULIPS

A Tulip is a perennial, bulbous plant that is part of the lily family. It is herbaceous herb with a rich flower, with many wild varieties that can enrich your living spaces.

They can be used to cultivate and enrich your garden, patio and fill any number of garden pots.