Press Release

Press Release

 Following 1st Enfield Literary Festival in 27th January at Edmonton Green library and on the back of the Lamb’s festival at All Saint’s church, Edmonton from 16-22nd June, this really is the year in which we celebrate the Borough’s Literary History with an interactive month of Workshops and Lectures for all tastes including children and families.

08th June, Enfield, London: 2018 sees the first major Enfield Literary Festival, which celebrates the borough’s rich cultural and literary heritage. Taking place on 22-30th June 2018 at the Dugdale Centre, Enfield. “Opening Books” with award-winning best selling authors, from children's to adults, packed full of workshops, a literary walking tour of Enfield, talks about Keats, Charles and Mary Lamb.

Highlights will include local school children from across Enfield participating in the festival with poetry readings, developed in collaboration with local poets celebrating creative schools poetry projects.

It will start on 22nd June from 5pm and run through to 30th June finishing at 10pm.

 The festival will comprise of a series of lectures and workshops with the majority of the tickets on sale at £5 per person at the Dugdale Centre box office.

For details of the programme see here.

Established by Martin Russo, Founder & Editor of Entwo for Enfield, to shine a light on the rich culture within Enfield and inspire others to channel their creative energy. Russo said “I am delighted to celebrate Enfield’s illustrious literary history with an event that caters for a variety of interests and it has been great to have Paul Everitt, head of Culture, Sport and Arts and his team support making this idea come alive.”

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For more information, images or an interview with a spokesperson from Enfield Literary Festival, please contact Martin Russo: info@entwo.org or 07817 618630

Notes to Editor:

Facebook @EnfieldLiteraryFestival2018 Twitter@ EN2LitFest

Tickets: www.EnfieldFestivals.co.uk/whats-on

Famous literary icons from Enfield include: Charles and Mary Lamb, John Keats, Florence Dugdale, Walter Pater, Gregory Motton, Jim Crace and Isaac Israeli.

Authors and an outline of the activities include:

Awarding winning and best selling author of ‘In A Cottage In A Wood’ Caroline Green; young adult fiction writers, award-winning authors of ‘Orange Boy and Indigo Donut, ’Patrice Lawrence and Catherine Johnson author of ‘Sawbones, The Curious Tale of the Lady Caraboo’; Sci-fi writers Allen Ashley, author John Lucas talks about gangs in his novel ‘Turf,’ author and former BBC journalist, Kurt Barling will be speaking among other works, about his book the ‘R’ Word’; enjoy national celebrated poet accompanied with music Roger McGough and & Little Machine. And reading for Poetry Night, includes Katherine Gallagher and Sonia Jeramas. Along with workshops for children and adults, that include children's writers Alex Woolf and Dee Shulman, plus talks on Keats by Linda Carey from Keats house and lectures by the Lamb Society, a literary walking tour of Enfield with Jay walk, there is truly something for everyone.

About the speakers and events please read details on the festival’s programme found here.

Poster

Enfield's literary legacy was celebrated at a festival aiming to inspire the next generation of writers.

Enfield's literary legacy was celebrated at a festival aiming to inspire the next generation of writers.

Enfield's literary legacy was celebrated at a festival aiming to inspire the next generation of writers.

The Arts Council-backed Enfield Literary Festival saw local authors give talks about their careers, offer advice, and host workshops. A lecture on one of the borough's most important historical figures, plus a talk on the future of journalism in the digital age, rounded off a varied and informative day.

Help persuade Enfield Council to divest from fossil fuels

Help persuade Enfield Council to divest from fossil fuels

Help persuade Enfield Council to divest from fossil fuels

By James Cracknell

Two years ago this month I cycled from London to Paris with a group of climate activists.

We were travelling to the United Nations’ COP21 climate talks, raising awareness of the importance of the talks along the way. On the Champs-Élysées we joined with tens of thousands of others – including many who had cycled from around Europe as we did – to demand the strongest possible global deal for reducing carbon emissions.

The outcome of this event, of course, was the Paris Agreement. It is the first single deal for all the world’s nations to reduce their carbon emissions, with an aim to limit global warming to below two degrees Celsius. For many people, including me, the deal is not strong nor ambitious enough. However, it is a starting point, and it is important that all political leaders – not just of nations but of regions, cities, and indeed local boroughs – do everything they can to meet the terms of the deal.

The Paris Agreement was formally ratified in November 2016 and recognises: “The need for an effective and progressive response to the urgent threat of climate change on the basis of the best available scientific knowledge."

A year later, however, it became clear that Enfield Council was not responding in the ‘effective and progressive’ manner the deal demands. Last month Fossil Free UK revealed that councils across the UK were investing more than £16billion in the fossil fuel industry. It showed that Enfield Council, through its pension fund, was investing more than £60million in such companies, representing 5.6% of its £1billion total investments.

Enfield’s poem-a-thon successfully raised funds at the Dugdale Centre, for the Enfield Refugee Welcome

Enfield’s poem-a-thon successfully raised funds at the Dugdale Centre, for the Enfield Refugee Welcome, the first Community Sponsorship group in the country to offer an opportunity of a new life to a family of refugees through the vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme. Packed full of poets and an appreciative audience, the event had already surpassed its target of £9000 before it had even finished and cakes helped to fuel both poets and the audience.

Read more here